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New Zealand Blue Books 1840-1855 now online

From the New Zealand Archives comes the following news:

"BLUE BOOKS 1840 TO 1855 NOW ONLINE

A detailed insight into times past is revealed in this country’s Blue Books 1840 to 1855 which are now available online, Archives New Zealand Chief Executive Dianne Macaskill said today.

“All 24 books which are a wonderful source of information about the workings of the early New Zealand government have been digitised,” Dianne Macaskill said. Read more »

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Ancestor Searching Newsletter, Volume 4, # 1

War of 1812 Genealogy: The War of 1812 generated a large volume of records and, fortunately, a sizable portion of them contain genealogical information on more than 280,000 military participants who fought on the US side. During the two and a half year war, records compiled included enlistment papers, muster rolls, pay rolls, attendance lists, regimental rosters, descriptive lists, account books (clothing, weapons, and ration issued), and discharge papers. Read more »

Gurley Library Fun Run

Saturday, May 9: the Friends of the Gurley Library are sponsoring their 11th annual Fun Run. Proceeds benefit the Gurley Library. Find out how to register >

Ancestor Searching Newsletter, Volume 3, # 12

Coat of Arms: Heraldry is the medieval art and science that deals with the creation, use, and recognition of visual displays that identify an individual person, guild, town, office or other entity. This was typically done through much of the Middle Ages using a painted shield which consisted of a unique arrangement of division lines, and objects known as "charges". Early in the Medieval period, this "coat of arms" was unique to an individual, only becoming associated with a family towards the end of the Renaissance.

Ancestor Searching Newsletter, Volume 3, # 10

Information Available from Passenger Lists: Probably more time is spent hunting for our ancestors on ship passenger lists than any other type of research. Many assume these records will reveal exactly where in the "old country" ancestors came from. It is not always that simple. Depending on when immigrant ancestors arrived, American ship passenger lists may or may not provide this information. In some instances determining the ancestral home can be discovered by tracking down naturalization papers, rather than ship passenger lists. Read more »

Papers of the War Department, 1784-1800

A new web site begun last year is now available to researchers looking for early War Department records. Papers of the War Department - 1784-1800 offers digital online images of over 55,000 documents painstakingly gathered together after visits to more than 200 repositories and the consulting of more than 3,000 collections in the United States, Canada, England, France, and Scotland. Excellent research material!

Nebraska Homestead Records

"The Homestead Act of 1862 changed the world with its offer of free land. Millions of people immigrated to America seeking their fortune, shifting populations along with the power of governments." Source: Homestead National Monument of America. Read more »

Slave Trade

Quoting from Diane Richard's article in 'Internet Genealogy', "the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 35,000 slaving voyages that forcibly embarked more than 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between 1514 and 1866. . . . the African names database identifies over 67,000 Africans aboard slave ships, using name, age, gender, origin and place of embarkation. Read more »

Ancestor Searching Newsletter, Volume 3, # 9

The National Library of Ireland was established by the Dublin Science and Art Museum Act, 1877, which provided that the bulk of the collections in the possession of the Royal Dublin Society, should be vested in the then Department of Science and Art for the benefit of the public and of the Society, and for the purposes of the Act. Read more »

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